You and your ex-spouse both make good money. You both have households where you don’t need support from the other person to provide for your child.

In your opinion, you don’t think paying child support is fair. You believe that since both of you earn enough to support your child’s needs and have a similar standard of living, you should eliminate support and focus on covering expenses when you have custody.

In your situation, you both share custody approximately 50-50. Your child is a teen, and they have their own job to support themselves. You had both put together a college fund for them at a young age, so that isn’t even in question. You think that what would be fairest is just to keep living responsibly and to provide support to your child as an when it’s needed.

Though cases like yours are rare, there is an opportunity to come up with your own child support arrangements outside court. In many cases, parents are able to agree to terms for child support without having to litigate or go before a judge. If you’re both amicable and can agree that support isn’t a necessity in your situation, then it may be possible to go without it.

Remember that child support is there to maintain a standard of living that would have been possible during marriage. It covers educational costs and medical costs as well as extracurricular activities. If you both are willing co-parents and don’t think support is essential, you may be able to negotiate a lower rate or agree to set aside more money for college or other expenses in lieu of monthly support.